District D
Thomas Lamb (non-partisan)

What role do you see the University of Alaska in general and UAA in particular playing in the state in the next two years? I would like to see the state setup a school voucher system to be used by 11th and 12th graders so they can attend technical training at U.A.A. I would like to see a weather technician program developed. 
 
Last year, the Alaskan legislature was supportive of the universities by reducing the budget cuts proposed by the Governor. How will you support increases in the UA budget? Through the creation of an education endowment.  
 
UAA has a growing need to properly maintain its facilities for housing and classrooms, and for its research, engineering, health, technical, and sports programs. What is your position on capital funding for facilities maintenance at UAA? I support capital funding especially for the technical side. Example a facility to teach weather technicians. I do support the creation of an oceanic research facility at Port MacKenzie. With the current mapping of the Gulf of Alaska, extensive research of the seamount is needed to understand their impact on the oceans and fisheries.

Huhnkie Lee (Republican)

What role do you see the University of Alaska in general and UAA in particular playing in the state in the next two years? Quality Education as before. UA is doing fantastic jobs.

Last year, the Alaskan legislature was supportive of the universities by reducing the budget cuts proposed by the Governor. How will you support increases in the UA budget? Funding should be adjusted to inflation rate at least, so limited budget increase is justified.

UAA has a growing need to properly maintain its facilities for housing and classrooms, and for its research, engineering, health, technical, and sports programs. What is your position on capital funding for facilities maintenance at UAA? Facilities should be maintained as before and its funding is justified.

Bernadette Rupright (Republican)

No response received

Loy Thurman (Republican)

No response received

Stephen Wright (Republican)

No response received

What role do you see the University of Alaska in general and UAA in particular playing in the state in the next two years? UAA needs to streamline all its processes and work more with the private sector which keeps it afloat. Due to the attacks by big government on the most important sector in our economy, UAA needs to retool and take the lead in providing students with real world opportunities that helps to build our private economy based on a maximum benefit for the people of Alaska.  Building and leading the way in rare earth development of our natural resources needs to be the focus of this institution. Critical medical and top of the line opportunities for state land development needs to come back into focus. Reduction and rightsizing government activity at this time has to happen.

 

Last year, the Alaskan legislature was supportive of the universities by reducing the budget cuts proposed by the Governor. How will you support increases in the UA budget?  I will support the governors agenda which is the people of Alaska's agenda. Outside groups need to cease their influence on our education which must not be agenda driven but driven by the economic climate we face.

 

UAA has a growing need to properly maintain its facilities for housing and classrooms, and for its research, engineering, health, technical, and sports programs. What is your position on capital funding for facilities maintenance at UAA? Many opportunities with private partnership and retooling of our education must start at the top with the vision of the school coming in line with the reality of our economy.  Downsizing and privatizing costs could help generate the revenue needed by this state activity at the highest levels. Don't fight change accept it and make it make us better as a people so that we will ultimately come out better for it.  Engineering, Health and technical training opportunities will help drive our economy into the future. We must streamline rightsize and move Alaska Forward by getting rid of inefficient ineffective activities that only promote an agenda. We must be all Alaska first.

David Wilson (Republican, incumbent)
 
District F
Jim Coopers

What critical roles do you see UAA playing in the state in the next two years?  The University system is crucial to a healthy, vibrant economy and community.  The higher the graduation rate from a higher learning establishment the higher the GDP of the local and national level. Also, with graduates remaining in the local area, the higher the standard of living becomes.  The entire community prospers when a fully functional University system is in the neighborhood.  The University also provides higher paying jobs which assists to bolster the community.
 
Last year, the Alaskan legislature was supportive of the universities by reducing the budget cuts proposed by the Governor.   How will you support increases in the UA budget? I think the University system should be fully funded.  Over the past 5 years the budget has been reduced resulting in a system that is not reaching its’ potential. We need to have the best University we can have.
 
UAA has a growing need to properly maintain its facilities for housing and classrooms, and for its research, engineering, health, technical, and sports programs.   What is your position on capital funding for facilities maintenance at UAA? With a fully funded University, the facility will be able to be maintained at the proper level.  Having a “new” University also has the potential to attract new and more students. Increased funding also allows for better programs to be added also attracting new students.  Again, I am in favor of fully funding the UAA system

Shelley Hughes (Incumbent, Republican)
 
District H
Madeleine Gaiser (Republican) 

No response received

Bill Wielechowski (Incumbent, Democrat)
 
District L
Roselynn Cacy (Democrat)

What role do you see the University of Alaska in general and UAA in particular playing in the state in the next two years? The University of Alaska (UAA) should play the most critical role of any agency in Alaska for the next two years.

This fall my 5-year-old granddaughter starts kindergarten in the Anchorage School District.  What will this look like?  UAA can help determine what her experiences will be like.

Right now, she will be attending online, without any friends.   UAA should be providing research and training to design a safe environment for a kindergarten class.  They could do a pilot class where the classroom surfaces are tested and the staff trained on how to keep them safe.   The air in the classroom should be tested along with the filtration system.  Change a few doorknobs to copper.  The wastewater should be tested to determine on a regular basis if anyone using the facilities has Covid-19.  When the facilities are safe, everyone entering the classroom should be tested.   The tests should be pooled so that the results can be quickly determined.

UAA needs funding to reinstate the Accreditations so that teachers can be home-grown and developing curriculum that relates to our current crises.  Nurses are vitally needed. The Community and Technical College has to continue training the workers that are needed now for safety and health services.  The School of Social Work is a resource to families facing drastic changes.  UAA knows how to provide distance delivery and should lead the way.

Each department needs to look at how they can immediately help Anchorage and Alaska in research, Capstone Projects and regular classes.  UAA needs to partner with the schools, the non-profits, the Municipality and private businesses.  Alaska desperately needs academic input in its decisions right now.  UAA should be providing the leadership out of this crisis.

Last year, the Alaskan legislature was supportive of the universities by reducing the budget cuts proposed by the Governor. How will you support increases in the UA budget? I will support increases in the UA budget by pointing out the total revenue and expenses in the budget, not just the general fund.  The legislature needs to review all of the income that the University brings to the State with both restricted and general funds.  When I was Director of the Adult Learning Center (ALC) at UAA, we received $100,000 a year in general funds, but we brought in over a million dollars in grants, contracts, tuition and fees.  

When funds are allocated to the University of Alaska Anchorage, the Balance Sheet needs to reflect the increase in assets.  The Alaska Permanent Fund is not the only asset of the State of Alaska.

UAA has a growing need to properly maintain its facilities for housing and classrooms, and for its research, engineering, health, technical, and sports programs. What is your position on capital funding for facilities maintenance at UAA? When funding is limited, it is critically important to protect our investments.  Facility maintenance is an investment that saves future expenditures.

Stephen Duplantis (Republican)

No response received

Natasha Von Imhof (Incumbent, Republican)
 
District M
Harold Borbridge (Republican)

No response received

Ray Metcalfe (Republican)

No response received

Josh Revak (Incumbent, Republican)
Anita Thorne (Democrat)

No response received

Nicholas Willie (Democrat)

No response received

 
District N
Cathy Giesel (Incumbent, Republican)
Lynette Moreno Hinz (Democrat)

No response received

Roger Holland (Republican)

No response received

Carl Johnson (Democrat)

What role do you see the University of Alaska in general and UAA in particular playing in the state in the next two years? Our economy cannot thrive or succeed without having a strong university to provide opportunity for Alaska’s residents to succeed. We have been so focused on how the economy and families will survive the COVID-19 pandemic that we have not planned on how the Alaskan economy will recover from it. Restoring the University of Alaska system, and UAA in particular, could be a crucial part of that recovery. Not only will younger people need to develop their education, but older adults may also need the opportunity to retrain in order to adapt to what economy arises from the pandemic. This cannot be possible with a pared-down university, but one that is offering more opportunity in academic pursuits across all disciplines.

Last year, the Alaskan legislature was supportive of the universities by reducing the budget cuts proposed by the Governor. How will you support increases in the UA budget? Our budget cannot be balanced through cuts in essential government services. The Legislature will have to develop new revenue in order to meet the challenges we face to overcome the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and get Alaska back on the right track. I will give honest and careful consideration to any legislation that will develop new revenue for the Alaska budget without harming Alaskan families. With such new revenue, then we could restore funding to the University of Alaska system. Such a restoration is essential. A college education provides opportunity – it helped my mother get our family out of poverty, it gave me opportunity to succeed. And even though I had achieved two degrees by the time I traveled to Alaska, I have personally benefited from programs offered through UAA, from culinary arts to writing to theatre. I have also taught as an adjunct faculty in Justice courses through the UA system at Mat-Su College. Everyone should have the opportunity to explore their potential through college, and I will work to ensure that the UA system can continue to thrive and provide such opportunity.

UAA has a growing need to properly maintain its facilities for housing and classrooms, and for its research, engineering, health, technical, and sports programs. What is your position on capital funding for facilities maintenance at UAA? My position is very simple: we need to fully fund facilities maintenance at UAA. We need to provide a learning environment that is conducive to education, growth, and development. This is not an area where we can “skimp” on funds, or ignore the expertise of those who have made careful planning in determining what the capital improvement and maintenance needs are for UAA facilities. Efficiencies are one thing, but allowing buildings and facilities to fall into disrepair is another. When we create a university system, construct buildings, and develop programs, we invest in our future and make a promise to ensure their success.